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Review: Lorde – ‘Pure Heroine’

Review: Lorde – ‘Pure Heroine’

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Ella Maria Lani Yelich-O’Connor, commonly known by her stage name ‘Lorde’ has stormed onto the popular music scene as of late, and for all the right reasons. Pushing aside the bullshit ‘What does the Fox Say’ shenanigans, she brings with her her own fascinating electropop style and elegant take on music.

At just 16, the New Zealand born musician displays an incredible knowledge of the world, cynicisms and all. It’s easy to sound patronising whilst saying that – as if a 16 year old couldn’t possibly be wise towards the ways of the world, but Lorde manages to mix this with commonplace affairs, like ‘counting dollars on the train, to the party’, without ending up as Rebecca Black V 2.0.

Personally, I think the minimalist presence of the entire album is one to be unquestionably admired. Displaying an almost superiority at her ability to captivate, astound and educate without the need for obnoxious blasts and absurd time signatures. It’s a simplistic art form, that blows me away without even getting a sweat on.

Pure Heroine carries a hypnotic quality to it. It’s a thought-provoking piece of art, like a Banksy stencil or a protest sign. It lulls you into a tranquil state whilst injecting you with lyrics that require patience and an open mind to slowly piece together into a story, comprised of fears, inspirations, aspirations and home truths.

Lorde’s style seems almost effortless, but not lackadaisical – Royals, the song you’ll most likely have her of first blends in a very honest sound with poetic brilliance. The entire album points towards not needing to shout to be heard, much like Lorde’s entrance to the UK music scene. An air of confidence rides through Pure Heroine, which you could argue makes the album title all that bit more appropriate.

Ribs will give you chills. The 50 second intro, which sounds almost like a shepherd’s tone as you learn wearily into it, is a haunting introduction into the mind of the singer. “It feels so scary, getting old”.

the track that stands out as being the most experimental, in comparison, is Glory And Gore. It’s certainly one of the more catchy songs on the album, although this is possibly because it sneaks in a few strong pop influences.

Tracks to listen out for: Tennis Court, Ribs, Glory And Gore, White Teeth Teens

Listen to Lorde – Royals below

Ella Maria Lani Yelich-O’Connor, commonly known by her stage name ‘Lorde’ has stormed onto the popular music scene as of late, and for all the right reasons. Pushing aside the bullshit ‘What does the Fox Say’ shenanigans, she brings with her her own fascinating electropop style and elegant take on music. At just 16, the …

Review Overview

Lorde - Pure Herione - 9.5

9.5

Summary : Minimalist beauty.

10

About Laurence Kellett

I'm the editor of Alt Music Review. Full time Digital Marketing Executive, part time music blogger, aspiring music journalist, occasional cat lover, manic CD buyer. Shinfo. You can find me on Google
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